A Travellerspoint blog

Russia

Russian Rubles, and Visas

Saint Petersburg, Peterhof and Pushkin


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2009 Baltic Cruise & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Prequel

My first (and only) trip to St Petersburg was by cruise ship. That is one of the most convenient ways to get to St. Petersburg. One advantage to this is that you don't have to get a visa provided that you use either the ship tours or a licensed guide tour as the tour ticket counts as your visa. My mother and father went to Russia together in the late 60's for a meeting. They visited Moscow and then took the train to St. Petersburg. When I looked at the 35 mm slides that my dad took, I was able to match some of my photos up with my dads.

End Prequel

I was quite worried about this port because I had arranged for a tour for the two of us with the Alla tour agency for a private car, driver and guide, and they warned us that the ship staff and cruise director would make it difficult for us to meet the guide in a timely manner.
Waterfront from where the ship docked

Waterfront from where the ship docked


And they did. They had the HAL (Holland American Line) tours (i.e. ship tours) very regimented, and indicated that no one could get off the boat at any time other than on a tour or with a visa. And they repeated the warning about how hard Russian immigration was and if there was the slightest mistake that we would hold everyone up and our names would be a hissing and a byword. (The First Book of Nephi...Ch 19 v. 14 And because they turn their hearts aside, saith the prophet, and despised the Holy One of Israel, they shall wander in the flesh, and perish, and become a hiss and a byword, and be hated among all nations. )

We scheduled to arrive at 0800 and it was going to be 64 deg F with a chance of rain. I thought that perhaps we could have breakfast first and get off at 0900, but the Alla instructions were to get off as soon as the ship was cleared. And well before 0800, the cruise director started calling the first tour which was scheduled for 0815.

Then she said that everyone with a visa (which we didn't have of course) must get off with the first group at 0800 or else they could not get off until all the ship tours had left. So we picked up and left without breakfast although we had some fruit in the room and B ate some (although she would not eat any of the bananas with dark spots on the skin).

In actual fact, no one where we were scanned out at the gangway on A Deck seemed to notice whether we had a tour sticker or not because our photos were still on the wrong cards. (Patricia - the lady that checked us into the cruise in Copenhagen had screwed them up) and that provided a distraction. Also I have a habit of putting the old tour stickers on my camera and on my cane, so I had various colors and numbered stickers - they just weren't for the current tour. Also there was no crowd yet as people were still getting organized.

We went to the Russian immigration area, and they did not seem to care whether we had a tour ticket or not - it did not seem that they looked at it. However at the end of the second day, the Captain made some comment about how people were misled by non-HAL people into thinking that they could get off without an excursion ticket.

The immigration people took one half of the document that we weren't supposed to separate, stamped our passports, gave us a Russian Landing Card which said it was the visa for the day. We were not to lose the RLC day visa (under monetary penalty or maybe death or imprisonment) or the other half of the pass. On the way back after the ballet, B found an extra RLC on the floor, and it didn't belong to any of our group, so someone must have gotten into trouble and had to pay some money.

We had been given three choices of ways to pay for the Alla tours - bank wire (which would have had to be done two weeks in advance and would have cost some additional money), credit card which would have cost 3% additional on the Russian side for being a foreign card, or cash, and the cash had to be new bills with no marks or stamps on them, because otherwise the bank would charge 10% extra. There was a discount for paying with cash. The cash could be dollars, or Euros.

It seemed to me that the cheapest option was cash, so I went to the bank and got a packet of brand new, still in the wrapper, fifty dollar bills. I got enough for the tour and the tip for the tour and some extra, and on the way to the ship I wore the money in a pouch under my bra.
Cruise ship terminal from the Alla driver's Mercedes

Cruise ship terminal from the Alla driver's Mercedes


We met the Alla people, and I had gotten the money to pay for the first half of the tour out of the safe, not realizing that I would need to pay for both days at once. I had brought money for possible use in buying stuff too, and managed with that to pay for 3/4ths of it. Alla the owner of the agency was upset that I had misunderstood and said that would be sufficient, that I wouldn't need to pay any more, and I couldn't figure out any way to pay the rest, as she was only there the first day.

Also, there was a mistake on the information on the website for our tour. It was listed as a three day tour, when of course we were only there for two days. Fortunately I had printed everything out (what we were doing and when, and what it was to cost as the three day tour would have been more expensive), so the guide went back to Alla and they appeared to be able to fix it easily.

I could never remember the names of either the guide or the driver, but they were both very good. He was driving his own Mercedes (gas) car, and he seemed to be able to drive very very close to parked cars. I was in the front seat so I could notice this easily. He never made me nervous.

The rest of the two days apart from the initial problem was strenuous (even though this was supposed to be an easy tour) but it was good.

The First Day - June 15th

Summary

We did a partial city tour, and then went to Peterhof by hydrofoil. We saw Peterhof and had a nice lunch and then drove to Catherine's Palace. B went by herself with the guide to see the palace and the Amber Room. Then we went back to the ship because the ballet tour was to start at 1900 and we wanted to have dinner first. The ballet was at the Palace Theatre (Soyuzsporttheatre) and was Swan Lake

First Day Details

The dock in St. Pete is out in an industrial area, so we drove into the city through faceless grey Soviet style apartment blocks which B said looked like slums to her.
Communist Apartment Blocks

Communist Apartment Blocks

large_100_4154.JPG
When we got into the city, there were a lot of gold spires and domes visible from along the river. The older buildings were painted in various colors (red, green, yellow) with white or off-white trim.
large_100_4170.JPG
The streets appeared in reasonable shape. The lights all have countdown timers on them
Countdown timer

Countdown timer


so you can tell when they will turn green or red, and there is a yellow light not only between the green and red, but also between the red and green.
Yellow between red and green at night

Yellow between red and green at night


Near as I could tell, gas was about 18.40 rubles/liter for 92 octane.
100_4163.JPG
I think there are about 6 rubles/$1.00. There were diamond signs (square ones) which sometimes had a yellow diamond on a white background.
Yellow diamond

Yellow diamond

Three black lines

Three black lines


Occasionally one would have two or three thin black lines diagonally across it. I asked about it and was told they were signs for the main road, and the three or four diagonal black lines were to indicate the end of something (like the end of the main road). Our first stop where we got out to take pictures was along the river at what the guide said were lighthouses (there were two).
Approaching (and sign with two black lines)

Approaching (and sign with two black lines)


4528809-River_Lighthouses_Or_Rostral_Columns.jpgNeptune?

Neptune?


Postcards and souvenirs

Postcards and souvenirs


These are apparently called the Rostrum. Apparently several times a year, they build a fire at the top of it in a kind of bazaar thing. (I find that it is a gas light.)
Bazaar at the top

Bazaar at the top


Stuck onto the side are ship bows which the guide said were the prows of vanquished enemies and there were statues around the bottom of Neptune, angel figureheads etc.
x100_4188.JPG100_4185.JPG
100_4190.JPGHermitage and a Ferry goes under the bridge

Hermitage and a Ferry goes under the bridge


The Rest of the Story: In the 19th century lights on these two columns actually served as aids to navigation to guide vessels in the Neva River. The style of the columns comes from ancient Greece and Rome where rostral columns were erected to commemorate naval victories. The ships stuck on the side of the shafts are called "rostra" and they do represent prows of captured ships. The stone figures at the bottom of these columns represent or personify the four rivers - Volga, Neva, Volchov and Dnieper.
100_4192.JPGDSCN0982.JPGOne of the four rivers

One of the four rivers


Old St Petersburg Stock Exchange across the street

Old St Petersburg Stock Exchange across the street


Then we continued with the guide giving us the names and history of the buildings and of the city.
Star on a bridge

Star on a bridge


Both of us took a lot of photos of horse statues, including the three of the four on the Anichkov Bridge
DSCN1056.JPGHorse Tamer's Statues

Horse Tamer's Statues

Horse Tamer's Statue

Horse Tamer's Statue

Bronze Horseman. Senate and Synod buildings are in the background

Bronze Horseman. Senate and Synod buildings are in the background


The Bronze Horseman is an equestrian statue of Peter the Great in the Senate Square in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Commissioned by Catherine the Great, it was created by the French sculptor Étienne Maurice
large_100_4224.JPGMonument to Nicholas I in front of St. Isaac's Cathedral

Monument to Nicholas I in front of St. Isaac's Cathedral


Alexander column

Alexander column


Palace Square in Saint Petersburg, Russia. The monument was raised after the Russian victory in the war with Napoleon's France. The column is named for Emperor Alexander I of Russia, who reigned from 1801–25
God Hermes on the facade of the Comedy Theater

God Hermes on the facade of the Comedy Theater


Sometimes I would ask a question and it would put her off her spiel a bit - especially as with questions about the road signs which she would have to ask the driver about. I asked about the Pectopah signs and was told that was the word for Restaurant - that the P was an R and a C was an S. So I figured out that CTON
CTON

CTON


was STOP and
large_DSCN1045.JPG
Macdohandc was McDonalds especially as there was a Golden Arches sign to give me a clue.

When I got home, I found that a few the photos I had taken on the city tour were photos of Kazan Cathedral aka (The Cathedral of Our Lady of Kazan). My photos were similar to the ones that my father took in 1970 when it was the Museum of the History of Religion and Atheism - it had been closed as a church in 1929, and was used for propaganda purposes.
7573405-Kazan_Cathedral_From_Forty_Years_Ago.jpgKazan_Cathedral_From_Forty_Years_Ago

Kazan_Cathedral_From_Forty_Years_Ago

Wing of  Our Lady of Kazan in 2009

Wing of Our Lady of Kazan in 2009


Services at the church were resumed in 1992, so when we were there in 2009, the museum (now called the Museum of the History of Religion) and the church co-existed in the building
7575478-Kazan_Cathedral_From_Forty_Years_Ago.jpgKazan_Cathedral 2009

Kazan_Cathedral 2009


Then (top) and Now (bottom)

Then (top) and Now (bottom)

Our next stop was outside the Church on the Spilled Blood.
Exterior of the Church on the Spilled Blood

Exterior of the Church on the Spilled Blood


This was built to commemorate the assassination of Emperor Alexander II who was was fatally wounded by political nihilists in March 1881. It is a very ornate Russian Orthodox church. We couldn't go inside at this time because it doesn't open until 10, but we got out and took pictures of the outside.
Top minarets

Top minarets

Detail

Detail

Blue and Green

Blue and Green


Souvenir stands

Souvenir stands


Canal

Canal

Diving Car?

Diving Car?


Someone at the Meet and Greet told us that the one thing they wanted to see was the inside of this church because last time she was here it was closed for renovation. It still had scaffolding on the outside.
Enter through scaffolding

Enter through scaffolding


Probably the best way to visit Peterhof is to take a hydrofoil across the Gulf of Finland to the jetty at the end of the Marine Canal. Three companies run regular hydrofoil services through the summer months from the Hermitage jetty, Angliskaya Naberezhnaya next to the Senate Building, and Universitetskaya Naberezhnaya next to the Academy of Sciences. We took the one from the Hermitage.
Hermitage

Hermitage

large_100_4417.JPGTall ship from the ferry

Tall ship from the ferry


Me on the ferry

Me on the ferry

Rostrum from the hydrofoil

Rostrum from the hydrofoil


We both took a little nap.
Cruising in to St. Petersburg

Cruising in to St. Petersburg

130608434533435-St_Peter_and..Petersburg.jpgSt. Peter and Paul fortressFrom the other side of the river

St. Peter and Paul fortressFrom the other side of the river


At one point we could see the ships at the terminal in the distance, and also we could see a nuclear power plant.
Cruise ship dock from the Peterhof hydrofoil

Cruise ship dock from the Peterhof hydrofoil

large_100_4294.JPG
They also have actual tours on river boats which I think would be fun to do.
Range marker

Range marker

Hydrofoil at the Peterhof dock

Hydrofoil at the Peterhof dock


We docked at Peterhof where Peter the Great had built palaces. The dock was at the end of a long pier.
large_100_4296.JPG
Map of the grounds at the ferry dock - all Russian

Map of the grounds at the ferry dock - all Russian


As we walked along the dock, we could see an old lighthouse.
963080474533411-Granddaughte..r_Peterhof.jpgPeterhof Lighthouse from the hydrofoil dock

Peterhof Lighthouse from the hydrofoil dock


It is on the south side of Neva Bay on the palace waterfron. It is an approximately 33 ft round cylindrical white tower with lantern, gallery, and skeletal braces on the seaward side. The lantern and watch room are red, and there is red vertical range stripe
Peterhof Lighthouse

Peterhof Lighthouse


Close-up of the Peterhof Lighthouse

Close-up of the Peterhof Lighthouse


We walked along a canal and through some forested area with other tour groups ebbing and flowing around us.
Canals leading toward the Grand Palace

Canals leading toward the Grand Palace

Canal water spout

Canal water spout

My granddaughter by the canal

My granddaughter by the canal


The first areas of land to be developed at Peterhof were the formal gardens around Monplaisir (part of the Lower Park). The Garden of Bacchus was also begun during Peter's reign, although additions were made to its statuary and fountains throughout the 18th century. The statue of Neptune on the corner was one of the first ones we saw after we got off the catamaran ferry and B went over to try and get a picture of it without other people there. Just as she got there a whole other group came, but she waited and was able to get a good picture of him by himself.
Neptune statue

Neptune statue

Tree with silver paint on old branch wounds

Tree with silver paint on old branch wounds


6824179-Formal_gardens_Peterhof.jpgFountain

Fountain

Fountain

Fountain

Formal gardens and clipped hedges

Formal gardens and clipped hedges

Gold statue

Gold statue

Garden house

Garden house


My granddaughter gave me her camera and went to activate one of the trick fountains - there was a bench there and if you walked up to sit on the bench, water would spray up your back.
caught

caught


But I couldn't get the camera to work so I missed the picture.
Trick fountain without occupant

Trick fountain without occupant


Later in the tour, she did get some of other people.
832945406821786-In_the_middl..s_Peterhof.jpgRunning away from the fountains

Running away from the fountains

6821805-Prepared_with_an_umbrella_Peterhof.jpgPrepared with an umbrella

Prepared with an umbrella


There are other trick fountains Two take the form of gangly trees rigged with jets that activate when someone approaches. Another, disguised as an umbrella with a circular bench set around the stem, drops a curtain of water from its rim when someone enters to take a seat, but I think I only saw the one with the bench with the cobblestone fountain area in front of it.
Singing in the shower

Singing in the shower


The smaller Upper Gardens are free, but entry to the Lower Gardens requires the purchase of tickets (not included in the boat fee for visitors arriving by hydrofoil). Our tickets were purchased for us by our guide so I don't know what they cost and the website doesn't really say what the price is.
large_DSCN1105.JPG
We did not tour the Grand Palace which was (like many palaces in many countries from this period of time) modeled after Versailles. Inside, the Grand Palace is reported to be considerably more lavish than Monplaisir, although the interiors had to be almost entirely reconstructed after World War 2. The long, narrow palace has minimal decoration. with two white pavilions with gilded cupolas at the end of the wings. But it is still impressive from the outside.
DSCN1128.JPGArriving Monplaisir

Arriving Monplaisir


When we got to the Monplaisir itself, we put on the booties over our shoes.
Booties for inside the palace

Booties for inside the palace


The guide
Our guide

Our guide


told us that Monplaisir was the favorite residence of Peter the Great. There were two wings with black and white tile floors and decorated ceilings and paintings on the walls. They had floor to ceiling windows on both sides of the fairly narrow corridor.
Ceiling

Ceiling

Peter the Great's Little Palace

Peter the Great's Little Palace

6821838-black_and_white_tile_floors_Peterhof.jpgMy granddaughters photo of me in the hall

My granddaughters photo of me in the hall

981726866821837-Russian_immi..r_Peterhof.jpgRussian immitation of Oriental lacquer

Russian immitation of Oriental lacquer

dining table

dining table


She said that the Peter and Catherine would come out here to relax by themselves with just some close friends - without a lot of servants. She even did the cooking. The tsar himself chose the location, perched right on the Gulf of Finland. Besides planning the inner layout and much of the interior decor, Peter also came up with the name for the palace — Monplaisir (meaning "my pleasure").
6824888-Monplaisir_interior_photos_Peterhof.jpgDutch-tiled pantry where Catherine would cook

Dutch-tiled pantry where Catherine would cook

large_DSCN1170.JPG
The palace was built between 1714 and 1723 by Andreas Schluter, Johann Friedrich Braunstein, Jean-Baptiste-Alexandre Le Blond and Nicola Michetti. The exhibits include, Chinese porcelain, Dutch faience, Russian glass and eighteenth-century cooking appliances. This is a small palace - other than the two wings, there was a sitting room, dining room, kitchen and butlers pantry, bedroom and study.
Tsar's bedroom

Tsar's bedroom

6824894-Chest_Peterhof.jpgChest and Table with artifacts

Chest and Table with artifacts


There was also a water closet.
water closet

water closet


The decorative moulding is a masterpiece of interior decoration.
Plasterwork

Plasterwork


Lilacs (or something that looked like lilacs) were in bloom around the grounds and the guide told us that they were wild.
Lilacs?

Lilacs?


Approaching the restaurant

Approaching the restaurant


Since we had not had breakfast, we decided to have lunch here. We walked a fairly long distance to where there was a tour group restaurant in cafeteria fashion. Originally when I was writing it up as a tip for VT it was difficult to figure out what the name of the restaurant was. I decided that it was the Standart.
Sign outside

Sign outside


This is what the website says: At the center of Nyzhniy park the "Standart" restaurant, surrounded by fountains, is located. Earlier at this site there was the Illumination Yard, served for storage of pyrotechnic equipment, and also "A launch slipway" - a storage, built by Peter I. At the restaurant's site there was a house of guard Nsarov, served at Ekaterina II. All buildings have been restored upon ancient drawings. The visiting of that restaurant will be a brilliant ending of meeting "the capital of fountains". Here you will have a nice rest after walking in the park and enjoy wonderfully cooked courses of Russian and European cuisine.

All the tables were reserved, except those outside. But because it looked like rain, we didn't want to eat outside. The guide was able to get one of the tables cleared so we could use it. I had a kind of cheese sandwich - it had cucumber and tomato along with a rolled up piece of cheese in a croissant.
Cheese Sandwich

Cheese Sandwich


We both had a bowl of meat and vegetable soup which had black things in it that I assumed were beans, but which turned out to be ripe olives. We put sour cream in it - sloppy service
Meat vegetable soup with olives and sour cream

Meat vegetable soup with olives and sour cream


but it was very good. I also had a kind of apricot pastry. Lunch cost me $40.00
Apricot pastry

Apricot pastry

It did rain while we were at lunch, but more or less stopped after lunch. Now we were to see the fountains and grounds, but I had done so much walking already that I told the guide to take B with her and she could take the pictures for both of us.

My granddaughter saw the Chess Cascade and many other fountains.
6824155-Chess_Cascade_Peterhof.jpgDragons at the top of the Chess Cascade fountain

Dragons at the top of the Chess Cascade fountain

Gold turrets peek over the trees

Gold turrets peek over the trees


The Upper Gardens south of the Grand Palace,consist of three alleys leading to the Palace, surrounded by formal flowerbeds and low, clipped hedges. But I didn't see all 64 different fountains, and over 200 bronze statues, bas-reliefs, and other decorations. At the center stands the statue of Samson wrestling the lion
Samson opening the lion's jaws

Samson opening the lion's jaws

Upper palace from afar

Upper palace from afar


6824942-Detail_Peterhof.jpgPart of the Peterhof Fountains

Part of the Peterhof Fountains

statue of Samson wrestling the lion

statue of Samson wrestling the lion

Grand Cascade

Grand Cascade

More photos of the grounds taken by my granddaughter

More photos of the grounds taken by my granddaughter


We were there in June so the official opening of the fountains at Peterhof had already taken place. This usually takes place at the end of May, is an all-day festival, with classical music, fireworks and other performances, as each section of the park's fountains is turned on one by one
More photos of the grounds taken by my granddaughter

More photos of the grounds taken by my granddaughter

Closeup of the top

Closeup of the top


I made my way up to the upper palace and waited for them.
My photo Walking up to the upper palace

My photo Walking up to the upper palace

large_6824148-Upper_Palace_at_Peterhof_Peterhof.jpg132852476824906-Additional_o..f_Peterhof.jpgUpper Palace Detail

Upper Palace Detail

Menager Fountain in Peterhof

Menager Fountain in Peterhof

Walkway in front of the palace

Walkway in front of the palace


I did see some of the Grand Cascade, the most famous ensemble of fountains, which runs from the northern facade of the Grand Palace to the Marine Canal.

By now the driver had arrived (the ferry is faster than driving) and picked us up, and we drove to Pushkin where Catherine's Palace with the Amber Room was. It was a long walk from where we were dropped off to the palace. Back way from the parking lot

Back way from the parking lot


Peeking through the fence

Peeking through the fence

Facade

Facade

Our guide approaching the palace ahead of us

Our guide approaching the palace ahead of us


By the time I got there, I knew that I would not make it much farther, so I sent B with the guide to see the palace, and I just sat and waited in the lobby. She could take pictures everywhere except the Amber Room. These are her photos
Floor detail and booties

Floor detail and booties

Costumed guard

Costumed guard

Mirror reflection

Mirror reflection

Window and wall detail

Window and wall detail

Red curtains and black and white floors

Red curtains and black and white floors

Corner furnace

Corner furnace

Green and gold room

Green and gold room

Blue room

Blue room

Dress model

Dress model

Paintings on the walls

Paintings on the walls

Room in the palace

Room in the palace

Tiled corner furnace

Tiled corner furnace

Green table

Green table

Dining room

Dining room


We went out the front side of the palace where throngs of people were waiting in line, Lines waiting to get in

Lines waiting to get in


and walked down along a road with souvenir sellers to the car.
Souvenir vendors

Souvenir vendors


We drove out the Egyptian gate about 1430.
Egyptian gate

Egyptian gate


Incidentally I asked to sit in the front seat so the guide was in the back with B. This really worked well - B was on the left side of the car and I was on the right. The drive back to the city took about a hour.
Railroad crossing?

Railroad crossing?

Trolley

Trolley

Wire Tracings Against the Sky

Wire Tracings Against the Sky

Moscow Triumphal Gate

Moscow Triumphal Gate


This was erected in memory of Russian victories in wars with Persia and Turkey between 1826 and 1829. It was once the biggest cast iron construction in the world.
Passig Nicolas I again

Passig Nicolas I again

Police car and a sports team having their photo taken in front of Nicolas I statue

Police car and a sports team having their photo taken in front of Nicolas I statue


We dressed for the ballet (Swan Lake with the "ballet stars of St. Petersburg" at the Soyuz Sport Theatre). and went up to the Lido
It is Monday - You can tell by the floor rugs in the elevators

It is Monday - You can tell by the floor rugs in the elevators


because we had to leave at 1900 (7 pm) and I did not think service would be quick enough in the dining room. B had a Grilled sirloin steak and fries

Grilled sirloin steak and fries


a roll and a fruit cup (official name Supreme of Fruits Galliano). I had
Shrimp cocktail

Shrimp cocktail


(Mediterranean Seafood Salad), a mixed green salad and some couscous.
Mixed green salad

Mixed green salad

When we went to the bus, a ship from the Aida cruise line was in front of our ship. I think it was AIDALuna
AIDA

AIDA


The Astor was also docked near us. The excursion bus took us into town and we when we crossed the river we saw the Pullmantur ship Zenith crossways in the river where it looked like she was stuck.
Zenith turning around in the river

Zenith turning around in the river

Zenith turning

Zenith turning


But really she had apparently come into the river and was being turned around to face out. It started to rain and we were stuck in a big traffic jam. The driver had a hard time getting us around the corners into where the theatre was.
Bolshoi_Gostiny_Dvor_And_Grand_Palace

Bolshoi_Gostiny_Dvor_And_Grand_Palace

626817224803002-Art_Square_P..Petersburg.jpgPalace Theatre

Palace Theatre

Ballet ticket (front and back)

Ballet ticket (front and back)


Apparently the Soyuz Sport Theatre has two shows running and I suspect they are mostly for tourists. One show is at the Hermitage and the other one was the one we went to at the Palace. The Palace is called the Theatre of Musical Comedy and was originally constructed in 1799 – 1801. Soon after 1910 it was bought by a private entrepreneur to be fitted out as a theatre. The theatre had a hard life through the wars, and has recently been refurbished.
54321204802987-Balcony_in_t..Petersburg.jpgAuditorium interior

Auditorium interior


Ballet dancers

Ballet dancers

Statue at the top of the stairs

Statue at the top of the stairs


The theatre website description of the building is as follows: Architecture is retained in primordial appearance, except just one lobby that was specially rebuilt as a grotto, which was stylish tendency in the beginning of XX century. Walls of this hall were faced with raw masonry, in which cracks were hidden electric light bulbs; and in small ponds placed in the corners of grotto water flowed. Sometimes in theatre came people who were not interested in theatre at all, they were just curious – they wanted to see the luxurious stairs and to visit grotto.

When I asked B if she had seen a ballet, her answer was that she hadn't. She meant that she hadn't seen Russian ballet, but she had seen Swan Lake and Nutcracker. She wasn't impressed with this production and neither was I. We both felt that the guy playing the prince was bored with it, and she said the chorus was missing the downbeat. I though the white swan (although not in the first flush of youth) had wonderful swan wing arms, the orchestra was good, and the scenery was OK. We liked the jester, and the dance the four ballerinas did with the crossed arms, and also the Spanish dance. We got back to the ship about 2300.
My granddaughter after the ballet

My granddaughter after the ballet

Granddaughter on the bus after the ballet

Granddaughter on the bus after the ballet


I think I would have done better to do the Folkloric excursion. The other night excursion (the gala) was canceled. B didn't take her camera to the ballet and she ended up the day with 440 pictures. I had 290.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:34 Archived in Russia Comments (2)

St. Petersburg Fore and Aft

Second Day


View Summer, 9-11-2001 - and then the 2nd time down the ICW & 2009 Baltic Cruise & Bermuda on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

16 June

Summary
The following day (June 16) we continued the city tour and then had early admission to the Hermitage and I had a wheelchair there. We ate lunch and then went to the Church of the Spilled Blood, Peter and Paul Fortress and St. Ivan's, where B climbed up to the dome.

Details
I made a wake-up call request (although the ship information said not to rely on the wake-up call) and also put in a request for breakfast to be delivered.

The wake-up call was for 7 am, and the breakfast request was for 7-7:30. So breakfast came at 6:50 before the wake-up call. This was the norm - no matter when I scheduled the wake-up call and breakfast the breakfast ALWAYS got there 10 minutes before the wake-up call. You'd think they did it on purpose that way. I put on B's robe and cleared the table off and the guy put the tray there. I got cranberry juice, a blueberry muffin and an omelet. It was too much to eat for breakfast. I really wanted hot oatmeal, but that wasn't available. B got scrambled eggs and OJ.
Room Service Breakfast

Room Service Breakfast


If it's Tuesday, it must be ....

If it's Tuesday, it must be ....


We were to meet our guide at 9, so we left the ship at 8:45.
Jewel of the Seas

Jewel of the Seas


was next to us at the dock. We drove around
Red to Yellow - the light will soon turn green

Red to Yellow - the light will soon turn green


and saw more of the city
Street lights

Street lights


100_4634.JPGFire station

Fire station

A Big Gun

A Big Gun

Statue which I can't find out who it is - Maybe Lenin?

Statue which I can't find out who it is - Maybe Lenin?

Hermitage

Hermitage


until our early opening appointment at the Hermitage at 9:50. Our guide got the tickets, a wheelchair for me and a ticket for permission for a camera to take photos (we both used the same permission which we paid for).
Hermitage early admission ticket (top), and camera permission (bottom)

Hermitage early admission ticket (top), and camera permission (bottom)


My granddaughter wheeled the chair. Having early admission is the only way to go. We had enough space to actually see the building itself in addition to the paintings.
Looking through a doorway to "St. George Hall"

Looking through a doorway to "St. George Hall"


Hermitage windows

Hermitage windows


We could take pictures of the elaborate inlaid floors
Inlaid Wood Mosaic floor

Inlaid Wood Mosaic floor

Floor mosaics

Floor mosaics

Ceiling arches

Ceiling arches

Mirrors reflecting the room

Mirrors reflecting the room


and the vases and decor around the walls.
6569081-Tapestry_Saint_Petersburg.jpgOur guide explaining a tapestry

Our guide explaining a tapestry


And of course we could always take pictures of the ceiling.
Ceiling

Ceiling

Chandilier

Chandilier

Chandelier

Chandelier

Ceiling like a tent

Ceiling like a tent

Ceiling paintings

Ceiling paintings

Ceiling and chandelier detail

Ceiling and chandelier detail

Room ID over the door

Room ID over the door


B got a lot of good pictures. Mine were sort of skewed as I was down lower looking up from the wheelchair.
Large Malachite vase from a wheelchair

Large Malachite vase from a wheelchair


You can rent headphones for an oral tour and some of the tour groups had these.

In the main museum are they have many other types of exhibits besides just paintings. Some of the departments were:

  • Machinery and Mechanisms

Bird sculpture

Bird sculpture

  • Furniture and Carriages

6569114-carved_table_Saint_Petersburg.jpgCarved table and other furniture

Carved table and other furniture

6569108-Hallway_Saint_Petersburg.jpgHall, Fireplace, desk and guard

Hall, Fireplace, desk and guard

  • Applied Arts
  • Textiles

Lace display

Lace display

  • Costumes
  • Sculpture

6569113-table_and_sculpture_Saint_Petersburg.jpgSculpture and Clock

Sculpture and Clock

  • Arms and Armour
  • Ceramics and Porcelain

6569112-Mosaics_Saint_Petersburg.jpgMosaics and Ceramics

Mosaics and Ceramics

  • Jewellery
  • Numismatics and Glyptics
  • Archaeological Artifacts

When you go to any large museum, you need to decide beforehand what it is that you want to see. Otherwise you will be completely worn out without having seen anything of interest to you. When I was in Madrid, I looked at the Spanish painters and the Bruegels. When I was at the British Museum in London I wanted to see the Rosetta Stone, the Elgin Marbles and also visited the Roman Britain exhibits. So after we admired the building we went up in an elevator which only took the wheelchair and B, Grandaughter making a face in the elevator

Grandaughter making a face in the elevator


and started in on the art collection which was chronological. We saw a couple of mosaic 'paintings',
101301786569134-Paintings_in..Petersburg.jpgPaintings in the Hermitage

Paintings in the Hermitage


and an awful lot of pictures.
War Gallery - skewed from the wheelchair

War Gallery - skewed from the wheelchair


We went up in another elevator that was bigger. At one point B couldn't get the wheelchair up over a threshold of about an inch.
6569121-Madonna_Saint_Petersburg.jpgMadonna

Madonna


681143566569120-Paintings_in..Petersburg.jpgolder painting - pre Impressionist

older painting - pre Impressionist


About 1100, we appeared to be mired in the Renaissance, so I asked to skip to the Impressionists
319196506569061-Portrait_of_..Petersburg.jpgRenior - my favorite

Renior - my favorite


and particularly to see Van Gogh which was my granddaughter's favorite. So we did. First we saw the four that were upstairs.
My granddaughter taking a photo

My granddaughter taking a photo


The museum has eight of them - Upstairs
1) Cottages 1890
Cottages

Cottages


2) Lilac Bush 1889
Lilac Bush  1889 (0ne of his least interesting)

Lilac Bush 1889 (0ne of his least interesting)


3) Memory of the Garden at Etten (Ladies of Arles) 1888
Memory of the Garden at Etten (Ladies of Arles)

Memory of the Garden at Etten (Ladies of Arles)


4) Arena at Arles 1888
Arena at Arles

Arena at Arles

In the second floor elevator to go down and see the last four Van Goghs there was a ramp and I almost ran into the wall with my wheelchair. You could see marks on the sides where other people had scraped.

Downstairs

1) White House at Night June, 1890
My granddaughter looking at White House at Night

My granddaughter looking at White House at Night


2) Morning: Going out to Work (After Millet) January, 1890
3) Portrait of Madame Trabuc September, 1889
My photo from the wheelchair - Mdm. Trabuc on the left

My photo from the wheelchair - Mdm. Trabuc on the left


4) Landscape with House and Ploughman October, 1889

We went to the bookstore at the museum and B got some postcards of her favorite paintings (as many of the Van Goghs that they had postcards for), and also a drawing book of Renior which I quite like but wasn't so much a favorite of hers. The shop has of reproductions of art from the Hermitage, catalogues of Hermitage exhibitions, guidebooks, books on art, colorful albums featuring the art collections of the Hermitage and many other museums of the world, and reproductions and posters. The shop displays furniture made according to originals in the museum collection.

There are also such things as replicas with a museum theme, souvenirs with Russian or St Petersburg motifs, ornaments, art books, jewellery, posters and postcards, video cassettes and more. There is an extensive choice of multimedia and video programs produced in different languages for different systems and audio recordings of works by Russian composers. You can buy replicas and copies of marble sculptures, bronzes, ceramics, numerous decorative works of jewelry based on motifs of the Scythian, Greek and oriental collections of the Hermitage, as well as works in the style of Faberge
Postcard area

Postcard area


Then since it was almost noon, so we decided to eat right there at the museum as it would be quick and cheap. Also my granddaughter was tired of pushing the wheelchair.
Hermitage Cafe

Hermitage Cafe


I took the opportunity to use the bathroom.
Sink and toilet in the rest room

Sink and toilet in the rest room

Me reflected in the ladies room mirror

Me reflected in the ladies room mirror


The Hermitage Cafe is situated in the Rastrelli Gallery on the ground floor of the Winter Palace. It was a big room with large windows on one side and a kind of cafeteria type area at one end. We mostly pointed at what we wanted to eat My granddaughter had a chocolate covered bun which proved to have sesame seeds on it and a sandwich. I had a sandwich and a pastry thing with currents on it.
My granddaugher's chocolate sesame bun and drink

My granddaugher's chocolate sesame bun and drink


My current studded pastry

My current studded pastry

Back into the car to drive across the river to the Church on the Spilled Blood (Russian: Церковь Спаса на Крови, Tserkovʹ Spasa na Krovi)
Church facade

Church facade

Granddaughter in front of Cathedral on the Spilled Blood

Granddaughter in front of Cathedral on the Spilled Blood


This is translated variously as the Resurrection of Christ Church (a.k.a.Church on Spilt Blood, The Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ, The Church of Our Savior on Spilled Blood, or The Resurrection Church). But everyone just calls it "The Church On the Spilled Blood".
lowest mosaics and tourists

lowest mosaics and tourists


Pillar with pictures of the disciples

Pillar with pictures of the disciples

Floor

Floor


Initially I thought that the name was Church OF the Spilled Blood and not ON the Spilled Blood. It is Russian Orthodox and was modeled after St. Basel's in Moscow. The astonishing thing about this church is that the interior decorations are all mosaics and not paintings.
Mosaics

Mosaics

ceiling mosaics

ceiling mosaics


Inside the domes were special mosaics
Dome mosaic Jesus as a young man

Dome mosaic Jesus as a young man

Cupola mosaics

Cupola mosaics

Jesus in the dome

Jesus in the dome


The outside is ornate to be sure, but it is the inside that is really astonishing. It never functioned as a public place of worship; having been dedicated exclusively to the memory of the assassinated tsar, the only services served in it were panikhidas (memorial services). Not surprisingly, the Church's construction ran well over budget, having been estimated at 3.6 million rubles but it ended up costing over 4.6 million. The walls and ceilings inside the Church are completely covered in intricately detailed mosaics — the main pictures being biblical scenes or figures — but with very fine patterned borders setting off each picture. It was reopened in August 1997, after 27 years of restoration,
Before restoration

Before restoration

Video tape of the reconstruction

Video tape of the reconstruction


but has not been reconsecrated and does not function as a full-time place of worship; it is a Museum of Mosaic. Mosaic Interior of the Church on the Spilled Blood

Mosaic Interior of the Church on the Spilled Blood

Ceiling

Ceiling

Mosaics

Mosaics

Altar

Altar


Canal boat next to the church

Canal boat next to the church


Another diving car

Another diving car


Granddaughter (age 12) and Guide

Granddaughter (age 12) and Guide


After that we went to Peter and Paul Fortress. This was the first building in Peter's new capitol. Peter built a fort on a small island in the Neva delta to protect the area from possible attack by the Sweden. The day that it was started - May 27, 1703 (May 16 according to the old calendar) became the birthday of the city of St Petersburg.
The island with all labels in Russian

The island with all labels in Russian


Ironically, although it was originally built for defense (hence the name Fortress), from 1721 onwards the fortress housed part of the city's garrison and rather notoriously served as a high security political jail. Among the first inmates was Peter's own rebellious son Alexei. Later, the list of famous residents included Dostoyevsky, Gorkiy, Trotsky and Lenin's older brother, Alexander. No prisoner ever escaped. The Cathedral was the first church in the city to be built of stone. On top of the cathedrals’ gilded spire stands a magnificent golden angel holding a cross.
Weathervane on top of Cathedral

Weathervane on top of Cathedral


This weathervane is one of the most prominent symbols of St Petersburg, and at 404 feet tall, the cathedral is the highest building in the city.

Our driver had a pass to drive into the fort and park, which put us much nearer the scene of action, but we still had to walk some.
Coming through the Sally Port

Coming through the Sally Port


We walked in the Sally Port and across to the church.
Manhole cover Peter and Paul fortress

Manhole cover Peter and Paul fortress


463558444797102-Coming_throu..Petersburg.jpgGranddaughter standing on rock

Granddaughter standing on rock


Granddaughter's feet

Granddaughter's feet

Inside Peter and Paul Fortress

Inside Peter and Paul Fortress


Peter and Paul

Peter and Paul


This is where all the tsars and their wives are buried although what shows in the church is not really the tombs which are underground protected by lead. The following Russian royalty are buried here

Peter I the Great (1672-1725) one of the best known Russian Tsars
Bust of Peter the Great and tomb of Anna Ivanovna Romanov

Bust of Peter the Great and tomb of Anna Ivanovna Romanov


Anna Ivanovna Romanov (1693-1740) Anna was the fourth-born daughter of the feeble-minded Tsar Ivan V, Peter the Great's older halfbrother, After Tsar Peter II, the son of Peter the Great's son Aleksey, died, the Supreme Privy Council, headed by Prince Dmitriy Golitsyn, elected her as Empress, although since she was a woman they put limits on her power. However, Empress Anna rejected these limits the Supreme Privy Council had proposed and reacted by having the Council dissolved. She crowned herself Empress on April 28, 1730 and immediately set to work governing the country the way she saw fit.

Czarina Cathrine II aka the Great (1729-1796) She was the last ruling Czarina and is credited with bringing Russia from the mind set of the Middle Ages to the modern world of the 18th century. There is some speculation that she had her husband murdered.
Catherine the Great

Catherine the Great


Maria Feodorovna Von Württemberg. (1759-1828) She was born Princess Sophia Dorothea of Württemberg, Germany (present day Poland), but became Maria Feodorovana when at her marriage she converted to the Russian Orthodox faith. Although her marriage to Czar Paul I was a political arrangement by Catherine II the Great, she was a devoted wife. She was patient and kind even with the dealings between her husband with his mental illness and her overbearing, strong-minded mother-in-law Catherine II the Great. She truly loved her husband, and was faithful to him even if he wasn't faithtful to her. She born 10 children, and because of her longevity, she buried six of them along with a husband. Her children married into many European royal families and gave her over 30 grandchildren.
Maria Feodorovna von Württemberg

Maria Feodorovna von Württemberg


Paul I (1754-1801) When Catherine II the Great of Russia died on Nov. 17, 1796, her only son at the age of 42 years, Emperor Paul I, became Russia's monarch. While his mother was Catherine, his father might not have been her husband Czar Peter III. Paul suffered with typhus, an infectious disease transmitted by body lice and fleas, which left his face disfigured with a ruddy-colored pugged nose, and he grew increasingly depressed and paranoid.The four-and-a-half years of Paul's rule in Russia were, according to some historians, "unquestionably the reign of a madman".
Paul I

Paul I


Elizabeth Petrovna Romanov-foot of her tomb-bust of peter in back

Elizabeth Petrovna Romanov-foot of her tomb-bust of peter in back


Elizabeth Petrovna Romanov (1709-1762) Daughter of Peter "the Great" and Catherine I. She named her nephew (Peter III) as her successor
Elizabeth II (on left) and Peter III (on  right)

Elizabeth II (on left) and Peter III (on right)


Peter III (1728-1762) He was the son of Duke Karl Friedrich of Holstein-Gottorp and Peter the Great's daughter Anna. In November of 1742 his aunt Empress Elizabeth appointed him the heir to the Russian throne. Peter and his wife, the future Catherine the Great, did not have a happy marriage, and there were rumors that their marriage was never even consummated. His first action upon taking power was to grant amnesty and return from exile to everyone his aunt Elizabeth had had arrested. Another of his early actions as Tsar was to get Russia out of the Seven Years' War (also known as the Pomeranian War or the French and Indian War). But his reign as Tsar was to be short-lived. His wife and her lover Grigoriy Orlov carried out a coup, arrested him, and forced him to sign his own abdication. While in the custody of the imperial guards in the Ropshinskiy Castle, Peter was murdered

Grand Duchess Catherine Mikhailovna of Russia (Ekaterina Mikhailovna) (1827-1894) was the third of five daughters of Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich of Russia (youngest son of Paul I of Russia) and Princess Charlotte of Württemberg. She married Duke Georg August of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (1824-76). They had four children:
1-Nikolaus (11 July 1854)
2-Helene (16 January 1857 – 28 August 1936); married Prince Albert of Saxe-Altenburg; they had no children.
3-Georg Alexander (6 June 1859 – 5 December 1909); married (morganatically) Natalia Vanljarskaya. Father of Duke Georg of Mecklenburg, Count of Carlow and great-grandfather of Duke Georg Borwin of Mecklenburg, current head of the House of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.
4-Karl Michael (17 June 1863 – 6 December 1934); renounced his succession rights in 1918
Grand Duchess Catherine Mikhailovna of Russia (Ekaterina Mikhailovna)

Grand Duchess Catherine Mikhailovna of Russia (Ekaterina Mikhailovna)

Alexandra Feodorovna Romanova (1798-1860)was the daughter of Frederick Wilhelm III, King of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. She married her second cousin Grand Duke Nikolai Pavlovitch. They had seven children. Nikolai ascended the throne in 1825 as Tsar Nicholas I. The tsarina interfered little in politics, preferring the role of devoted wife and mother. Empress Alexandra was widowed in 1855, and died five years later at the age of 62.
Alexandra Feodorovna Romanova

Alexandra Feodorovna Romanova



But there are others. On July 17th 1918 the Emperor Nicholas II, and his family were murdered. The Czar, his wife, Alexandra, their five children and four family attendants were herded into a cellar room by their Bolshevik captors and killed. According to a report by the Czar's chief executioner, two of the bodies taken from the Yekaterinburg cellar were burned, and the rest buried. The missing bodies belonged to the Romanov heir, Alexei, who was 13 when he was killed, and one of his sisters, either Maria, then 19, or her 17-year-old sister Anastasia.

It was not until 17 July 1998, eighty years to the day after their murder in the cellar of the Ipatiev House at Ekaterinburg, the earthly remains of Emperor Nicholas II, his wife, four daughters, his heir and also Dr Botkin and the three faithful servants were laid to rest in an obscure side chapel at the Peter and Paul Fortress cathedral, in a room just barely big enough to accommodate the 45 surviving Romanov relatives due to assemble for the event.
4797269-Window_of_the_chapel_Saint_Petersburg.jpgChapel

Chapel


Those interred in the chapel included

Nicholas Alexandrovich Romanov b. May 6, 1868 d. Jul. 17, 1918
Alexandra Feodorovna Romanov b. 6 June 1872 d. 17 July 1918
Olga Nikolaevna Romanova b. Nov. 15, 1895 d. Jul. 17, 1918
Tatiana Nikolaievna Romanova b. Jun. 10, 1897 d. Jul. 17, 1918
Maria Nikolaievna Romanov b. Jun. 27, 1899 d. Jul. 17, 1918

Alexei Yegorovich Trupp was the faithful valet of Czar Nicholas II b. 1857 d. Jul. 17, 1918

Anna Stepanova Demidova was a personal maid to Czarina Alexandra Romanov who was murdered with the family b. 1878 d. Jul. 17, 1918

Ivan Alexandrovich Khartinotov the cook of Czarina Alexandra Romanov who was murdered with the family b. 1870 d. Jul. 17, 1918

Dr Eugene Sergeievich Botkin, was the faithful physician of Czarina Alexandra Romanov who followed the royal family into exile and house arrest. He was murdered along with the royal family b. 1864 d. Jul. 17, 1918
Side chapel

Side chapel


The disposition of the bodies of Anastasia Nikolaevna Romanov, b. Jun. 18, 1901 d. Jul. 17, 1918 and the heir Alexis Nicholaevich Romanov b. Jul. 30, 1904 d. Jul. 17, 1918 is unknown.

The Boat House is now a souvenir shop for visitors. Inside is also a small boat made by Peter the Great.

I am interested in photographing cemeteries and memorials and statues that are found there. Our guide wasn't able to think of any cemeteries that were near to the normal tourist path - except the Commandant's Cemetery in Peter and Paul Fortress. So afterwards (at my request) we went around and saw that graveyard where all the commandants of the fortress were buried. It is by the East Wall (the altar wall) of the Peter and Paul Fortress, where 19 out of 32 commandants of the fortress were buried.
Cemetery overview

Cemetery overview

Informational sign

Informational sign

List of the burials and map

List of the burials and map


100_4599.JPGMonuments

Monuments


The tradition of burying the Commandants here was started when Robert Bruce (Russian: Роман Вилимович Брюс, Roman Vilimovich Bruce; 1668–1720) the first chief commander of Saint Petersburg was buried here. Of Scottish descent, he was the brother of Jacob Bruce. His tomb is opposite the cemetery gate in the iron fence
Robert Bruce (the stone with the cross)

Robert Bruce (the stone with the cross)


which was erected in 1842-43. Only those who had attained the rank of Commandant or Chief Commandant were eligible to be buried here. Beginning in the 18th century, commandants were often appointed for life. During the reign of Alexander I, it became a tradition to appoint highly decorated war veterans to this post and that allowed them to end their careers in a relatively peaceful fashion. They were also the Commandants of the city of St. Petersburg. Mostly they served ceremonial functions.

In 1963-64 the cemetery was restored and the soil in the middle of the cemetery (where the 18th century graves are located) was lowered to the original level. New foundations were built for the stones to mark the exact burial places, damaged stones were rebuilt and missing stones were added.
Looking at tables of souvenirs

Looking at tables of souvenirs


My granddaughter browsed for souvenirs at some of the outdoor stalls.

Next we visited St. Ivan's Cathedral where they do still have services. I said - There's not room for that many people unless they all stand. The guide said - We don't sit during services. So that explained that. St. Isaac's Cathedral is one of Russia's most famous churches and is extensively decorated with detailed mosaic icons, paintings and columns made of malachite and lapis lazuli. It is the largest cathedral in Russia and it was built between 1818 and 1858, by the French-born architect Auguste Montferrand. It is dedicated to Saint Isaac of Dalmatia, a patron saint of Peter the Great who had been born on the feast day of that saint.
Granddaughter on steps of St. Isaacs

Granddaughter on steps of St. Isaacs


St Isaac's door

St Isaac's door


Ceiling of entrance

Ceiling of entrance

Facade of St Isaacs

Facade of St Isaacs

Dome

Dome

Sculpted dove (Holy Spirit) suspended under dome

Sculpted dove (Holy Spirit) suspended under dome

4797330-looking_up_Saint_Petersburg.jpgDSCN1745.JPGSt Isaacs ceiling

St Isaacs ceiling


Inside were models of the previous buildings on the site and the current cathedral. Foreign visitors should buy entrance tickets just inside the right-hand door in the southern facade (not at the street-level ticket booth). Although the website says there is no photography inside, I obviously did not find that to be the case.
Earlier models

Earlier models


Model of an earlier Rinaldiesque structure

Model of an earlier Rinaldiesque structure

Model of current cathedral

Model of current cathedral


There was, of course, a place to buy stuff at St. Isaacs.
399198584797326-On_the_left_..Petersburg.jpgShop  on the left

Shop on the left


You can't have a lot of tourists in Russia without having a place for them to buy souvenirs.
Souveniers

Souveniers

Closeup of one of the cases

Closeup of one of the cases


After we saw St. Isaacs, the guide took me back to the car
St. Isaacs between two buses

St. Isaacs between two buses


and B climbed to the top of the dome which I understand is the fourth highest in the world - St. Peter's being the tallest. She said her legs burned afterwards, as there are over 200 steps.
Along the colonnade

Along the colonnade

Looking down

Looking down

From the top of St. Isaac's

From the top of St. Isaac's

Side dome

Side dome

Gardens below

Gardens below

Stairway from side down from colonaide

Stairway from side down from colonaide

Stairs down

Stairs down


We got back to the ship about 1545,
Pushkin?

Pushkin?


We passed this statue almost every time we came back to the ship. I tipped the guide and driver in rubles as much as possible, but also in dollars. I found that B had some rubles hidden away, which I could have used. She had about 350 rubles and all I was able to get for them was $3.00

Most of the people who took the HAL tours complained about
a) tiring
b) crowded - especially in the Hermitage as none got early admission and so they said they couldn't see much because of all the people.
From in the dining room

From in the dining room


After dinner (I had the
Pineapple boat

Pineapple boat


pear soup and
Prime rib

Prime rib

Pecan Pavlova with Strawberries

Pecan Pavlova with Strawberries


and B had
French onion soup

French onion soup


I went out on deck and took pictures of various aids to navigation (lighthouses etc. until I got too cold to stay out there (about 2000).
Lesnoy Mole Range Rear?

Lesnoy Mole Range Rear?


4532688-Tall_thin_red_one_Saint_Petersburg.jpgTall thin red one and Multicolored - usually a river entrance

Tall thin red one and Multicolored - usually a river entrance

The first lighthouse that I saw (and which I could identify) was the Kronstadt Rear Range Light which is in back of the main lighthouse in this series. It is the very tall (177 feet) lighthouse is an octagonal unpainted concrete tower with a red lantern and gallery located near the east end of the naval harbor at Kronstadt
4532668-Kronstadt_Range_Rear_Kronshtadt.jpgKronstadt (Range Rear)

Kronstadt (Range Rear)


The lighthouse- built in the early 1920s is active. It is an octagonal unpainted concrete tower with a red lantern and gallery. It is located near the east end of the naval harbor at Kronstadt
Kronstadt (Range Rear)

Kronstadt (Range Rear)

Kronstadt (Range Rear)

Kronstadt (Range Rear)


Fort Kronshlot (Kronstadt Range Front) - This is the current lighthouse, which was built near the walls of Fort Kronshlot. Built by Peter the Great in 1704, Fort Kronshlot is the oldest of the many fortresses protecting Kronstadt and St. Petersburg. The range guides ships up the channel on the south side of Ostrov Kotlin toward the naval base at Kronstadt. Located on a small island just west of the naval base, near the east end of Ostrov Kotlin. This is an active lighthouse of 82 feet - a round red cast iron tower with a lantern and a gallery.
63021824532661-Kronstadt_Ra..Kronshtadt.jpgKronstadt Range Front

Kronstadt Range Front

Kronstadt Range Front

Kronstadt Range Front

Kronstadt Range Front

Kronstadt Range Front

Kronstadt Range Front over the fort

Kronstadt Range Front over the fort


Voennaya Gavan is a hexagonal cylindrical cast iron skeletal tower, painted red.
Voennaya GavanLight -Kronstadt Rear Range Light

Voennaya GavanLight -Kronstadt Rear Range Light

It is located at the corner of a pier at the extreme southeastern tip of the Kronshtadt naval base, about 400 m (1/4 mi) southwest of the Lomonosov Kanal lighthouse.
4532700-Srednyaya_Gavan_Light_Kronshtadt.jpgVoennaya Gavan Light

Voennaya Gavan Light


Little power boat rounds the point

Little power boat rounds the point


Morskoy Kanal Range Rear This light is very much like the Kronstadt (Range Rear) that at first I thought they were the same. But the Kronstadt rear range light has a gallery most of the way up the tower (and is taller), and it is also on a larger piece of land than this structure is. This octagonal 131 foot tower built in 1914 is an active lighthouse. There are black and white horizontal bands on the side facing the range line which in my picture can only be seen along the edge of the lighthouse. The Morskoy Kanal is the dredged channel through Neva Bay from Kronstadt to St. Petersburg. The range is an outbound (westbound) range guiding ships away from St. Petersburg and is located about half a mile southwest of Fort Kronshlot.
large_4533298-Morskoy_Kanal_Range_Rear_Kronshtadt.jpg
Morskoy Kanal Range Front
Morskoy Kanal Range Front

Morskoy Kanal Range Front


Built in 1914, it is an active lighthouse described as a 66 ft octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery. The lighthouse is unpainted gray concrete, except the side facing the range is painted black with a white vertical stripe on the range line which is located about 1 mi southwest of the Kronstadt lighthouse. Accessible only by boat. I didn't see the painted range side.
Kronshtadt / Sredney Gavani Front Range

Kronshtadt / Sredney Gavani Front Range


The Sredney Gavani Front Range is a quick-flashing red light, visible only on the range line. 12 m (39 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower; the front of the tower is covered by a daymark colored white with a red vertical stripe. This range guides eastbound vessels. Located on a detached breakwater south of the naval harbor.
large_4533364-Photos_from_a_passing_Ship_Kronshtadt.jpg

Kabotazhnaya Gavan Range Rear This is a lighthouse-range marker which is quite outstanding in the Kronstadt harbor area.It is a 102 ft square tower faced with white siding,
Kabotazhnaya Gavan Range Rear white

Kabotazhnaya Gavan Range Rear white

324369934531588-Kabotazhnaya..Kronshtadt.jpgKabotazhnaya Gavan Range Rear

Kabotazhnaya Gavan Range Rear


except for the huge red and black range marker on the range line. The lantern is painted red.
This light is a rear range light that guides naval vessels as they enter the Kronstadt naval station. It stands on the Petrovskaya Pristan (mole), one of the breakwaters protecting the main harbor of Kronstadt, the traditional and historic home port of the Russian Navy.
Kabotazhnaya Gavan Range Rear

Kabotazhnaya Gavan Range Rear


Kabotazhnaya Gavan Range Front This is described as a 49 ft square skeletal tower, mounted on a square concrete pier that is enclosed in whole or part by a wood daymark painted red with a black vertical stripe on the range line.
4532649-Range_Marker_Kronshtadt.jpgRange marker

Range marker

Range Marker lined up

Range Marker lined up


This light is a front range light that guides naval vessels as they enter the Kronstadt naval station. Located about 600 m (0.4 mi) north of Fort Kronshlot. Although I didn't see much red or black.
Cruise ship following us out

Cruise ship following us out


large_4533367-Photos_from_a_passing_Ship_Kronshtadt.jpg
Historic Kronstadt cathedral

Historic Kronstadt cathedral


Kronshtadt (often spelled Kronstadt) is the historic home port of Russia's Baltic Fleet. The city and naval base are built on Kotlin Island, located 30 km (19 mi) west of St. Petersburg.
Naval Port

Naval Port


4533371-Photos_from_a_passing_Ship_Kronshtadt.jpgAntenna?

Antenna?


695132724533264-Unknown_red_..Kronshtadt.jpgUnknown red skeleton jetty marker and Unknown range marker

Unknown red skeleton jetty marker and Unknown range marker

large_4533370-Photos_from_a_passing_Ship_Kronshtadt.jpg
Boat outside the harbor

Boat outside the harbor


Fort Nikolai Range Front I didn't see this range marker lined up with the range, but I saw the range marker structure on one side of it as we rounded Fort Kronshlot.
Rounding Fort Kronshlot

Rounding Fort Kronshlot


According to the internet, this was build in 1891 and has been inactive since the early 1920s when the current Fort Kronshlot Light was built.
Fort Nikolai Range Front

Fort Nikolai Range Front


It is a 52 ft round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted red, built just outside the walls of Fort Kronshlot (formerly Fort Nikolai). It is located 200 yd west of the Fort Kronshlot Light on a small island just west of the naval base, near the east end of Ostrov Kotlin.
Fort Nikolai Range Front

Fort Nikolai Range Front


The civilian port of Lomonosov on the mainland is 2 mi to the south. I have quite a few pictures of this and the current light as we passed quite close to Fort Kronshlot.Fort Nikolai Range Front with another cruise ship

Fort Nikolai Range Front with another cruise ship


4533368-Photos_from_a_passing_Ship_Kronshtadt.jpg4533369-Photos_from_a_passing_Ship_Kronshtadt.jpg
large_4533365-Photos_from_a_passing_Ship_Kronshtadt.jpgJetty marker

Jetty marker


4532680-Red_Jetty_marker_Kronshtadt.jpgRed and Green jetty markers

Red and Green jetty markers

Red and white tower similar to Korabel'nyy Kanal lighthouse

Red and white tower similar to Korabel'nyy Kanal lighthouse


Then we went in to the Russian sale of souvenirs on the ship, and I bought some inexpensive things.
Souvenir tables on the ship

Souvenir tables on the ship


Tomorrow we are in Helsinki

Posted by greatgrandmaR 20:38 Archived in Russia Comments (0)

(Entries 1 - 2 of 2) Page [1]